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Cross, Philip S. "A Life at Rayville - Part II." History Trails 14 (Winter 1980): 5-8.
Annotation / Notes: Reminiscences of Baltimore County from the 1840s to the 1920s.
Greaver, Earl R. "Gourmets All." History Trails 31 (Winter 1996-Spring 1997): 5-7.
Greaver, Earl R. "Idaho Reds." History Trails 30 (Spring 1996): 9-11.
Guroff, Margaret. "Glenn L. Martin." Baltimore 92 (July 1999): 30-31.
Mascari, Ruth. "A Parkton Girlhood." History Trails 17 (Spring 1983): 9- 10.
Parry, Ann Hollingsworth. "Domestic Life on a Farm near Glen Falls." History Trails 31 (Winter 1996-Spring 1997): 8.
Whitman, Suzanne Voss White. The Knoll in Green Spring Valley. Baltimore: Gateway Press, 1985.
Witcover, Jules. White Knight: The Rise of Spiro Agnew. New York: Random House, 1972.
Annotation / Notes: Spiro Agnew rose from Baltimore County Executive to Governor of Maryland to Vice President under Richard Nixon. Although he did not complete his term as Governor, Agnew was instrumental in reforming and reorganizing the state government. He got the attention of the national Republican Party for his firm response to the racial and political unrest of the 1960s. As Vice President, Agnew gained acclaim and notoriety for speeches that attacked the administration's opponents. Ultimately, a criminal indictment for activities that occurred in his Baltimore County days led to his resignation as Vice President.
Diggs, Louis S. Since the Beginning: African American Communities in Towson. Baltimore: Uptown Press, 2000.
Annotation / Notes: East Towson, Sandy Bottom, Lutherville, Schwartz Avenue.
Orser, W. Edward. "Neither Separate Nor Equal: Foreshadowing Brown in Baltimore County, 1935-1937." Maryland Historical Magazine 92 (Spring 1997): 4-35.
Anson, Melanie D. Olmsted's Sudbrook: The Making of a Community. Baltimore: Sudbrook Park, Inc., 1997.
Annotation / Notes: Sudbrook Park is one of the few neighborhoods where Frank Law Olmsted's plan was carried out to its entirety. It is a nationally significant example of community design. It was the first, and most important, Olmsted suburb in the region.
Breihan, Jack. "Necessary Visions: Community Planning in Wartime." Maryland Humanities (November 1998): 11-14.
Annotation / Notes: During World War II, as a result of the growth of the domestic immigration of industrial workers, two planned communities were developed in the Baltimore metropolitan area. The first of these was Baltimore County's Middle River, a community for whites, a project of the Martin aircraft plant. The second was Cherry Hill, a south Baltimore, black community. They were both garden suburbs focused on a central commercial center.
Cross, E. May. "The Patent Medicine Show and Other Events at Rayville." History Trails 33 (Spring 1999): 9-12.
Cross, E. May. Dundalk, Then & Now 1894-1980. Dundalk, MD: Dundalk-Patapsco Neck Historical Society, 1980.
Fee, Elizabeth, et. al. "Baltimore by Bus: Steering a New Course through the City's History." Radical History Review 28-30 (1984): 206-216.
Annotation / Notes: A discussion of the development of the alternative, left oriented "People's Bus Tour" of Baltimore. The tour's intention was to demonstrate the diversity of Baltimore and to show the conflicts and processes that affected the City's working class. Class relations are interpreted throughout Baltimore's history by visiting significant and visually interesting places.
Fee, Elizabeth, Linda Shopes, and Linda Zeidman, eds. The Baltimore Book: New Views of Local History. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press, 1991.
Annotation / Notes: Eleven essays documenting the working class history of Baltimore, stretching across many of Baltimore's neighborhoods -- from Federal Hill to Hampden, Edmondson Village to Dundalk. This work grew out of a "People's History Tour of Baltimore." Each chapter includes a map of relevant sites. There are fifteen interviews. It is well illustrated and includes an excellent bibliography.
Frank, Beryl. Way Back When in Sudbrook Park. Baltimore: Sudbrook Park, Inc., 1997.
Annotation / Notes: The major focus of this work are the one to two pages, illustrated, histories of 17 selected houses. Although architecture is mentioned, the major focus is on the lives of the people who occupied the houses. Their is a description of community life by the activities of the months. Over 60 people were interviewed for this work.
Grimes, Michael A. The Development of Baltimore's Northwest Corridor, 1919-1930. Columbus, OH: Society for American City and Regional Planning History, 1989.
McGrain, John W. "The Intense Utilization of Gwynns Falls." History Trails 26 (Autumn 1991-Winter 1991-92): 7-8.
Martinak, George J. A Short History of Essex and Middle River. Second printing. N.p., 1963.
May, Huguette D., and Anthea Smith. Finding the Charm in Charm City: Affectionate Views of Baltimore. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998.
Annotation / Notes: A modern photo documentary, using color Polaris Image Transfers of "charming spots" in Baltimore. These spots may not be considered so charming any place else in the world, but definitely display Baltimore's character. Through these image the authors show buildings, building details, and streetscapes. There is an accompanying text that gives a brief history of neighborhoods, buildings, and roads. A visual documentation of Baltimore in the 1990s.