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Birch, Alison Wyrley. "The Lady Was a General." Maryland 12 (Autumn 1979): 7-11.
Annotation / Notes: Anna Ella Carroll (1815-1893) was the daughter of a governor of Maryland whose own political career was an exception to the secondary role of most 19th century women in national affairs. In the 1850s and 1860s, Carroll wrote political tracts and advised political leaders in the Know Nothing and Republican parties. She also contributed to Union military strategy during the Civil War, corresponding with Abraham Lincoln and others in Washington.
Butterfield, L. H. "Tending a Dragon-killer: Notes for the Biographer of Mrs. John Quincy Adams." Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society 118 (1974): 165-178.
Cordts, Jeanne M. "Douglas Love and the Molly Maguires." Journal of the Alleghenies 32 (1996): 97-105.
Coryell, Janet L. Neither Heroine Nor Fool: Anna Ella Carroll of Maryland. Ph.D. diss., College of William and Mary, 1986.
Earle, W. H. "The Phantom Amendment and the Duchess of Baltimore." American History Illustrated 22 (November 1987): 32-39.
Annotation / Notes: Jerome Bonaparte's American wife.
Frasseto, Claude B. Betsy Bonaparte, ou la Belle de Baltimore. [France]: J.C. Lattes, 1988.
George, Joseph. "'A True Childe of Sorrow': Two Letters of Mary E. Surratt." Maryland Historical Magazine 80 (Winter 1985): 402-405.
Horowitz, Helen Lefkowitz. The Power and Passion of M. Carey Thomas. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1994.
Levin, Alexandra Lee. Henrietta Szold: Baltimorean. Baltimore: Jewish Historical Society of Maryland, 1976.
Turnbull, Pauline, ed. May Lansfield Keller: Life and Letters. Verona, VA: The McClure Press, 1975. [1877-1964].
Adams, E. J. "Religion and Freedom: Artifacts Indicate that African Culture Persisted Even in Slavery." Omni 16 (November 1993): 8.
Diedrich, Maria. Love Across Color Lines: Ottilie Assing and Frederick Douglass. New York: Hill & Wang, 1999.
Driggs, Margaret Barton. "They Called Her Moses: Harriet Tubman." Maryland 13 (Summer 1980): 20-23.
Fowler, David Henry. Northern Attitudes toward Interracial Marriage; A Study of Legislation and Public Opinion in the Middle Atlantic States and the States of the Old Northwest. Ph.D. diss., Yale University, 1963.
Gerdes, M. Reginald. "To Educate and Evangelize: Black Catholic Schools of the Oblate Sisters of Providence (1828-1880)." U.S. Catholic Historian 7, nos. 2-3 (1988): 183-99.
Johansen, Mary Carroll. "'Intelligence, Though Overlooked:' Education for Black Women in the Upper South, 1800-1840." Maryland Historical Magazine 93 (Winter 1998): 443-65.
Annotation / Notes: Black and white educators established forty-six schools for free black children in the early nineteenth century. These educators supported education for black women believing that women transmitted knowledge and morals, thus shaping a generation of virtuous citizens. In addition, educators looked to education as a means by which to form self-sufficient and industrious free black communities.
Morgan, Winifred. "Gender-Related Difference in the Slave Narratives of Harriet Jacobs and Frederick Douglass." American Studies 35 (Fall 1994): 73-94.
Morrow, Diane Batts. The Oblate Sisters of Providence: Issues of Black and Female Agency in their Antebellum Experience, 1828-1860. Ph.D. diss., University of Georgia, 1996.
Pickett, T. H. "The Friendship of Frederick Douglass with the German Ottilie Assing." Georgia Historical Quarterly 73 (Spring 1989): 88-105.
Terborg-Penn, Rosalyn. "Black Women Freedom Fighters in Early 19th Century Maryland." Maryland Heritage News 2 (Spring 1984): 11-12.
Anderson, George M. "The Civil War Courtship of Richard Mortimer Williams and Rose Anderson of Rockville." Maryland Historical Magazine 80 (Summer 1985): 119-138.
Annotation / Notes: The story of the couple's courtship taken from Williams's writings. Insight is offered into life in Rockville, the county seat, during that period.
Beirne, Francis F. The Amiable Baltimoreans. New York, 1951; reprint, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1984.
Annotation / Notes: A social history of Baltimore City told through thematic chapters. Chapter topics are varied and include a wide range of subjects: i.e. monuments, food, sports, Hopkins Hospital, newspapers, and politics.
Dessaint, A. Y. Southern Maryland Yesterday and Today: Crab Pots and Sotweed Fields. Prince Frederick, MD: Calvert County Historical Society, 1984.
Annotation / Notes: Historic photographs and excerpts from 60 of the "best" works on Southern Maryland. Arranged predominately by theme, the chapters include working the land, working the water, life in the home, and life in the community. A ten page introduction gives a brief chronological history of the area.
Fee, Elizabeth, Linda Shopes, and Linda Zeidman, eds. The Baltimore Book: New Views of Local History. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press, 1991.
Annotation / Notes: Eleven essays documenting the working class history of Baltimore, stretching across many of Baltimore's neighborhoods -- from Federal Hill to Hampden, Edmondson Village to Dundalk. This work grew out of a "People's History Tour of Baltimore." Each chapter includes a map of relevant sites. There are fifteen interviews. It is well illustrated and includes an excellent bibliography.
Forman, Henry Chandlee. The Rolling Year on Maryland's Upper Eastern Shore. Centreville, MD: Corsica Bookshop, 1985.